Author: Salovey, P.

A further consideration of the issues of emotional intelligence

(2004)
Center Authors: Salovey, P., Caruso, D. R.

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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/consideration-issues-emotional-intelligence/

The authors continue the discussion of emotional intelligence by addressing the points raised by the commentators on the original target article. The authors address the following concerns: theoretical issues, methodological issues, empirical issues and future directions.

Mayer, J.D., Salovey, P., & Caruso, D.R. (2004). A further consideration of the issues of emotional intelligence. Psychological Inquiry, 15, 249-255.doi:10.1207/s15327965pli1503_05

Emotional intelligence: Theory, findings, and implications

(2004)
Center Authors: Salovey, P., Caruso, D. R.

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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/emotional-intelligence-theory-findings-implications/

Scientific viability of emotional intelligence is discussed by addressing the issues of terminology, measurement, public perception through media outlets, and public criticism in this field.

Mayer, J. D., Salovey, P., & Caruso, D. R. (2004). Emotional intelligence: Theory, findings, and implications. Psychological Inquiry, 15, 197-215.

Emotional intelligence and social interaction

(2004)
Center Authors: Brackett, M. A., Salovey, P.

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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/emotional-intelligence-social-interaction/

Two studies found positive relationships between the ability to manage emotions and the quality of social interactions, supporting the predictive and incremental validity of an ability measure of emotional intelligence, the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT).

Lopes, P. N., Brackett, M. A., Nezlek, J. B., Schütz, A., Sellin, I., & Salovey, P. (2004). Emotional intelligence and social interaction. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 30, 1018-1034.doi: 10.1177/0146167204264762

A comparison of athletes and non-athletes at highly selective colleges: Academic performance and personal development

(2004)
Center Authors: Salovey, P.

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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/comparison-athletes-non-athletes-highly-selective-colleges-academic-performance-personal-development/

Student-athletes were studied over 4 years to compare their academic, social and personal well-being outcomes to students who were not athletic. Various outcomes of the comparison study are reported.

Aries, E., McCarthy, D., Salovey, P., & Banaji, M. R. (2004). A comparison of athletes and non-athletes at highly selective colleges: Academic performance and personal development. Research in Higher Education, 45, 577-602. doi:10.1023/B:RIHE.0000040264.76846.e9

Measuring emotional intelligence with the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT)

(2006)
Center Authors: Brackett, M. A., Salovey, P.

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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/measuring-emotional-intelligence-mayer-salovey-caruso-emotional-intelligence-test-msceit/

This chapter discusses considerations for measuring emotional intelligence with the MSCEIT.

Brackett, M. A., & Salovey, P. (2006). Measuring emotional intelligence with the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT). In. G. Geher (Ed.), Measurement of emotional intelligence (pp. 179-194). Hauppauge, NY: Nova Science Publishers. Reprinted in 2006 in Spanish in Psichothema.

Applied emotional intelligence: Regulating emotions to become healthy, wealthy, and wise

(2006)
Center Authors: Salovey, P.

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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/applied-emotional-intelligence-regulating-emotions-become-healthy-wealthy-wise/

This chapter discusses two particular applications of EI: staying physically well and making good financial decisions. The author argues that the appropriate regulation of emotions is an important predictor of good health and wealth.

Salovey, P. (2006). Applied emotional intelligence: Regulating emotions to become healthy, wealthy, and wise. In J. Ciarrochi, J. P. Forgas & J. D. Mayer (Eds.), Emotional intelligence in everyday life (2nd ed.) (pp. 229-248). New York, NY: Psychology Press.

Benefits of emotional intelligence

(2006)
Center Authors: Salovey, P.

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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/benefits-emotional-intelligence/

This chapter provides an overview of how emotional intelligence can lead to positive life outcomes: the authors discuss scientific findings that indicate some of the ways in which EI contributes to a good life.

Grewal, D., & Salovey, P. (2006). Benefits of emotional intelligence. In M. Csikszentmihalyi & I. S. Csikszentmihalyi (Eds.), A life worth living: Contributions to positive psychology (pp. 104-119). Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.

Emotional intelligence and the self-regulation of affect

(2006)
Center Authors: Brackett, M. A., Salovey, P.

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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/emotional-intelligence-self-regulation-affect/

The chapter discusses the differences and similarities between the ability and mixed models of EI, most specifically the issues regarding the ability and self-report measurement of EI.

Grewal, D., Brackett, M. A., & Salovey, P. (2006). Emotional intelligence and the self-regulation of affect. In. D. K. Snyder, J. A. Simpson, & J. N. Hughes (Eds.), Emotion regulation in couples and families (pp. 37-55). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

The jury persuaded (and not): Computer animation in the courtroom

(2006)
Center Authors: Salovey, P.

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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/jury-persuaded-computer-animation-courtroom/

In two experiments, the authors examined the persuasiveness of computer animation on juror decision making by comparing animation to diagrams in two mock trials— a plane crash case and a car accident case. The persuasiveness of the animation on verdicts was dependent on the case. The role of familiarity with the depicted scenario is discussed as a possible explanation for the differing impact of animation.

Dunn, M. A., Salovey, P., & Feigenson, N. (2006). The jury persuaded (and not): Computer animation in the courtroom. Law & Policy, 28, 228-248. doi:10.1111/j.1467-9930.2006.00225.x

Need for cognition and message complexity in motivating fruit and vegetable intake among callers to the cancer information service

(2006)
Center Authors: Salovey, P.

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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/need-cognition-message-complexity-motivating-fruit-vegetable-intake-among-callers-cancer-information-service/

This field experiment examined the impact of an individual’s need for cognition (the tendency to enjoy thinking deeply about issues), complex versus simple messages, and the interaction of both on encouraging fruit and vegetable consumption. Although the need for cognition did not predict intake, longitudinally, complex messages were more effective than simple messages.

Williams-Piehota, P., Pizarro, J., Navarro Silvera, S. A., Mowad, L., & Salovey, P. (2006). Need for cognition and message complexity in motivating fruit and vegetable intake among callers to the Cancer Information Service. Health Communication, 19, 75-84. doi:10.1207/s15327027hc1901_8

The strategic use of gain- and loss-framed messages to promote healthy behavior: How theory can inform practice

(2006)
Center Authors: Salovey, P.

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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/strategic-use-gain-loss-framed-messages-promote-healthy-behavior-theory-can-inform-practice/

In this study, the authors review the state of research and theory on message framing (Rothman & Salovey, 1997), and how it can inform efforts to enhance health practices throughout the cancer care continuum. Gain-framed appeals are more effective when targeting behaviors that prevent the onset of disease, whereas loss-framed appeals are more effective when targeting behaviors that detect the presence of a disease.

Rothman, A. J., Bartels, R., Wlaschin, J., & Salovey, P. (2006). The strategic use of gain- and loss-framed messages to promote healthy behavior: How theory can inform practice. Journal of Communication, 56, s202-s220. doi:10.1111/j.1460-2466.2006.00290.x

Emotional intelligence and social and academic adaption to school

(2006)
Center Authors: Salovey, P.

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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/emotional-intelligence-social-academic-adaption-school/

In this study among Spanish adolescents, the ability to understand and manage emotions, assessed by a performance measure of emotional intelligence (the MSCEIT), correlated positively with teacher ratings of academic achievement and adaptation for both males and females. Other significant findings included positive correlation with peer friendship nominations among girls.

Mestre, J. M., Guil, R., Lopes, P. N., Salovey, P., Gil-Olarte, P. (2006). Emotional intelligence and social and academic adaption to school. Psicothema, 18, 112-117.

Evidence that emotional intelligence is related to job performance and affect and attitudes at work

(2006)
Center Authors: Salovey, P.

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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/evidence-emotional-intelligence-related-job-performance-affect-attitudes-work/

This study reported that emotionally intelligent individuals received greater merit increases and held higher company rank, received better peer and supervisor rating of interpersonal facilitation and stress tolerance than their counterparts.

Lopes, P. N., Grewal, D., Kadis, J., Gall, M., & Salovey, P. (2006). Evidence that emotional intelligence is related to job performance and affect and attitudes at work. Psicothema, 18(Suplemento), 132-138.

Spanish version of the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT) Version 2.0: Reliabilities, age, and gender differences

(2006)
Center Authors: Salovey, P.

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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/spanish-version-mayer-salovey-caruso-emotional-intelligence-test-msceit-version-2-0-reliabilities-age-gender-differences/

This study examined the reliability of the Spanish version of the MSCEIT. Results demonstrated a good reliability and internal consistency, a high level of convergence between scoring methods, higher scores obtained by women, and a positive correlation between the scores of MSCEIT and the age.

Extremera, N., Fernández-Berrocal, P., & Salovey, P. (2006). Spanish version of the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT). Version 2.0: reliabilities, age and gender differences. Psicothema, 18(Suplemento), 42-48.

Relating emotional abilities to social functioning: A comparison of self-report and performance measures of emotional intelligence

(2006)
Center Authors: Brackett, M. A., Rivers, S. E., Salovey, P.

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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/relating-emotional-abilities-social-functioning-comparison-self-report-performance-measures-emotional-intelligence/

The studies reported in this article examine the role of emotional abilities (assessed with both self-report and performance measures) in social functioning. Implications for analyzing how emotional abilities contribute to social behavior are discussed, as is the importance of incorporating gender into theoretical frameworks and study designs.

Brackett, M. A., Rivers, S. E., Shiffman, S., Lerner, N., & Salovey, P. (2006). Relating emotional abilities to social functioning: A comparison of self-report and performance measures of emotional intelligence. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 91, 780-795. doi:10.1037/0022-3514.91.4.780