Author: Latimer, A. E.

Motivating cancer prevention and early detection behaviors using psychologically tailored messages

(2005)
Center Authors: Latimer, A. E., Salovey, P.

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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/motivating-cancer-prevention-and-early-detection-behaviors-using-psychologically-tailored-messages/

Tailoring health messages to make them salient to recipients is a strategy to motivate cancer prevention and early detection behaviors.To summarize our tailoring approach, we review findings from six field experiments conducted in collaboration with the NCI’s Cancer Information Service examining the utility of psychologically tailored messages. Findings suggest that messages congruent with the recipients’ psychological style of health information processing are more persuasive in promoting screening mammography and fruit and vegetable consumption than mismatched messages.

Latimer, A. E., Katulak, N. A., Mowad, L., & Salovey, P. (2005). Motivating cancer prevention and early detection behaviors using psychologically tailored messages. Journal of Health Communication, 10, 137-155. doi: 10.1080/10810730500263364

Message framing for smoking cessation: The interaction of risk perceptions and gender

(2008)
Center Authors: Toll, B. A., Salovey, P., Mazure, C. M., Latimer, A. E.

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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/message-framing-for-smoking-cessation-the-interaction-of-risk-perceptions-and-gender/

The article reported on a clinical trial of message framing for smoking cessation with bupropion to examine how gender differences in perceptions of the risks associated with quitting influence the effects of framed interventions using number of days to smoking relapse as the criterion. Results indicate that women report a higher perceived risk of cessation than men. Participants who anticipated high risks associated with quitting smoking reported fewer days to relapse.

Toll, B. A., Salovey, P., O’Malley, S. S., Mazure, C. M., Latimer, A., & McKee, S. A. (2008). Message framing for smoking cessation: The interaction of risk perceptions and gender. Nicotine & Tobacco Research, 10, 195-200. doi: 10.1080/14622200701767803

Targeting or tailoring?

(2008)
Center Authors: Rivers, S. E., Latimer, A. E., Salovey, P.

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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/targeting-or-tailoring/

This article reviews psychographics and matched messages as specific strategies for targeting and tailoring messages in health care marketing. Message tailoring needs to fit messages to individual characteristics, such as personality factors like coping styles or preferences for thinking extensively about choices.

Schmid, K. L., Rivers, S. E., Latimer, A. E., & Salovey, P. (2008). Targeting or tailoring? Maximizing resources to create effective health communications. Marketing Health Services, 28, 32-37.

Promoting fruit and vegetable intake through messages tailored to individual differences in regulatory focus

(2008)
Center Authors: Latimer, A. E., Salovey, P.

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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/promoting-fruit-and-vegetable-intake-through-messages-tailored-to-individual-differences-in-regulatory-focus/

This study examined whether tailoring messages to individuals’ regulatory focus (RF), the tendency to be motivated by promotion versus prevention goals, increased the persuasiveness of messages encouraging greater FV intake. RF may be a promising target for developing tailored messages promoting increased FV intake, and particularly for encouraging individuals to meet FV guidelines.

Latimer, A. E., Williams-Piehota, P., Katulak, N. A., Cox, A., Mowad, L., & Salovey, P. (2008). Promoting fruit and vegetable intake through messages tailored to individual differences in regulatory focus. Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 35, 363-369. doi:10.1007/s12160-008-9039-6

Encouraging cancer patients to talk to their physicians about clinical trials

(2008)
Center Authors: Latimer, A. E., Salovey, P.

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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/encouraging-cancer-patients-to-talk-to-their-physicians-about-clinical-trials/

This study examined the effectiveness of detailed and nondetailed information for encouraging cancer patients to discuss clinical trials with their physicians. The detailed messages led to greater intentions to discuss clinical trials than nondetailed messages among low-NFC participants. High-NFC participants’ understanding, intentions, and behavior were not differentially affected by the detailed message.

Latimer, A. E., Williams‐Piehota, P., Cox, A., Katulak, N. A., Salovey, P., & Mowad, L. (2008). Encouraging cancer patients to talk to their physicians about clinical trials: Considering patients’ information needs. Journal of Applied Biobehavioral Research, 12, 178-195. doi: 10.1111/j.1751-9861.2008.00020.x