Author: Ivcevic, Z.

Predicting school success: Comparing Conscientiousness, Grit, and Emotion Regulation Ability

(2014)
Center Authors: Ivcevic, Z., Brackett, M. A.

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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/predicting-school-success-comparing-conscientiousness-grit-emotion-regulation-ability-2/

The present paper examines validity of three proposed self-regulation predictors of school outcomes – Conscientiousness, Grit and Emotion Regulation Ability (ERA). In a sample of private high school students (N = 213) we measured these constructs along with indices of school success obtained from records (rule violating behavior, academic recognitions, honors, and GPA) and self-reported satisfaction with school. Regression analyses showed that after controlling for other Big Five traits, all school outcomes were significantly predicted by Conscientiousness and ERA, but not Grit. The discussion focuses on the importance of broad personality traits (Conscientiousness; measure of typical performance) and self-regulation abilities (ERA; measure of maximal performance) in predicting school success.

“Ivcevic, Z., & Brackett, M. (2014). Predicting school success: Comparing Conscientiousness, Grit, and Emotion Regulation Ability. Journal of Research in Personality. 52, 29-36. DOI: 10.1016/j.jrp.2014.06.005”

Predicting school success: Comparing Conscientiousness, Grit, and Emotion Regulation Ability

(2014)
Center Authors: Ivcevic, Z., Brackett, M. A.

DOWNLOAD
http://ei.yale.edu/publication/predicting-school-success-comparing-conscientiousness-grit-emotion-regulation-ability/

The present paper examines validity of three proposed self-regulation predictors of school outcomes – Conscientiousness, Grit and Emotion Regulation Ability (ERA). In a sample of private high school students (N = 213) we measured these constructs along with indices of school success obtained from records (rule violating behavior, academic recognitions, honors, and GPA) and self-reported satisfaction with school. Regression analyses showed that after controlling for other Big Five traits, all school outcomes were significantly predicted by Conscientiousness and ERA, but not Grit. The discussion focuses on the importance of broad personality traits (Conscientiousness; measure of typical performance) and self-regulation abilities (ERA; measure of maximal performance) in predicting school success.

Ivcevic, Z., & Brackett, M. (2014). Predicting school success: Comparing Conscientiousness, Grit, and Emotion Regulation Ability. Journal of Research in Personality. 52, 29-36. DOI: 10.1016/j.jrp.2014.06.005

Integrating emotion and cognition: The role of emotional intelligence

(2004)
Center Authors: Brackett, M. A., Lopes, P., Ivcevic, Z., Salovey, P.

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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/integrating-emotion-cognition-role-emotional-intelligence/

In this chapter, the authors argue that emotional intelligence is one way to reconceptualize the relation between reason and emotion, and review emotional intelligence from a systems perspective, i.e. in a broader context of an individual’s functioning.

Brackett, M. A., Lopes, P., Ivcevic, Z., Mayer, J. D., & Salovey, P. (2004). Integrating emotion and cognition: The role of emotional intelligence. In D. Dai & R. Sternburg (Eds.), Motivation, emotion, and cognition: Integrating perspectives on intellectual functioning (pp. 175-194). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.

The can and cannot do attitude: How self-estimates of ability vary across ethnic and socioeconomic groups

(2013)
Center Authors: Ivcevic, Z.

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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/can-attitude-self-estimates-ability-vary-across-ethnic-socioeconomic-groups/

This study examined group differences in the self-concept of intelligence and creativity. We compared self-concept of ability in relation to ethnic group membership (White, African American, and Hispanic) and social class (working class, middle class) in a large sample of undergraduate students (N = 3289). Results showed that both ethnicity and social class were related to self-estimates of ability (favoring White and middle class students), with group differences being stronger for intelligence than creative abilities. White middle class students showed an advantage in their self- concept of intelligence in comparison to minority working class students. For self-estimates of creativity, however, White middle class students showed an advantage only in relation to working class Hispanic, but not African American students.

Ivcevic, Z., & Kaufman, J. C. (2013). The can and cannot do attitude: How self-estimates of ability vary across ethnic and socioeconomic groups. Learning and Individual Differences, 27, 144–148. DOI: 10.1016/j.lindif.2013.07.011

Emotional intelligence and emotional creativity

(2007)
Center Authors: Ivcevic, Z., Brackett, M. A.
Topics:
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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/emotional-intelligence-and-emotional-creativity/

Three studies examined the relationship between emotional intelligence (EI) and emotional creativity (EC) and whether each construct was predictive of creative behavior.  Self-report measures of EC significantly correlated with laboratory and self-reported creativity measures in both studies, while ability measures of EC only correlated with self-reported artistic activity. EI was uncorrelated with creative behavior.

Ivcevic, Z., Brackett, M. A., & Mayer, J. D. (2007). Emotional intelligence and emotional creativity. Journal of Personality, 75, 199-236. doi:10.1111/j.1467-6494.2007.00437.x.