Author: Elbertson, N. A.

Casting health messages in terms of responsibility for dietary change: Increasing fruit and vegetable consumption

(2004)
Center Authors: Elbertson, N. A., Salovey, P.

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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/casting-health-messages-terms-responsibility-dietary-change-increasing-fruit-vegetable-consumption/

This study compared the effectiveness of messages emphasizing the importance of either personal or social responsibility for dietary behavior change in increasing fruit and vegetable intake. As a result, both types of messages as part of this minimal intervention increased intake substantially.

Williams-Piehota, P., Cox, A., Silvera, S. N., Mowad, L., Garcia, S., Elbertson, N. A., & Salovey. P (2004). Casting health messages in terms of responsibility for dietary change: Increasing fruit and vegetable consumption. Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, 36, 114-120. doi:10.1016/S1499-4046(06)60146-2.

Emotional intelligence in the classroom: Skill-based training for teachers and students

(2006)
Center Authors: Brackett, M. A., Elbertson, N. A.

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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/emotional-intelligence-classroom-skill-based-training-teachers-students/

In this chapter, the authors describe two programs that fulfill CASEL’s requirements for social-emotional learning programs, and also are compatible with mandates set by No Child Left Behind (NCLB). Both programs are anchored in EI theory: The Emotionally Intelligent Teacher and the Emotional Literacy in the Middle School.

Brackett, M. A., & Elbertson, N. A. (2006). Emotional intelligence in the classroom: Skill-based training for teachers and students. In J. Ciarrochi & J. D. Mayer (Eds.), Improving emotional intelligence: A practitioner’s guide (pp. 1-27). New York: Psychology Press/Taylor & Francis.

A sustainable skill based approach to developing emotionally literate schools

(2008)
Center Authors: Brackett, M. A., Stern, R., Rivers, S. E., Elbertson, N. A., Salovey, P.

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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/a-sustainable-skill-based-approach-to-developing-emotionally-literate-schools/

This chapter addresses the need for emotionally literate schools, importance of emotional literacy for students, teachers, and school leaders, and implementation plan for schools.

Brackett, M. A., Patti, J., Stern, R., Rivers, S. E., Elbertson, N. A., Chisholm, C., & Salovey, P. (2009). A sustainable, skill-based approach to building emotionally literate schools.  In M. Hughes, H. L. Thompson, & J. B. Terrell (Eds.), The handbook for developing emotional and social intelligence: Best practices, case studies, and strategies (pp.329-358). San Francisco, CA: Pfeiffer/John Wiley & Sons.

Comparing gain- and loss-framed messages for smoking cessation with sustained-release bupropion: A randomized controlled trial

(2007)
Center Authors: Toll, B. A., Elbertson, N. A., Latimer, A. E., Salovey, P.
Topics:
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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/comparing-gain-and-loss-framed-messages-for-smoking-cessation-with-sustained-release-bupropion-a-randomized-controlled-trial/

Prospect theory suggests that because smoking cessation is a prevention behavior with a fairly certain outcome, gain-framed messages will be more persuasive than loss-framed messages when attempting to encourage smoking cessation. Results suggest that gain-framed messages may be more persuasive than loss-framed messages in promoting early success in smoking cessation for participants who are engaged in treatment.

Toll, B. A., O’Malley, S. S., Katulak, N. A., Wu, R., Dubin, J. A., Latimer, A., Meandzija, B., George, T. P., Jatlow, P., Cooney, J. L.,  & Salovey, P. (2007). Comparing gain-and loss-framed messages for smoking cessation with sustained-release bupropion: A randomized controlled trial. Psychology of addictive behaviors: Journal of the Society of Psychologists in Addictive Behaviors, 21, 534. doi: 10.1037/0893-164X.21.4.534

Promoting participation in physical activity using framed messages: An application of prospect theory

(2008)
Center Authors: Latimer, A. E., Rivers, S. E., Elbertson, N. A., Salovey, P.

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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/promoting-participation-in-physical-activity-using-framed-messages-an-application-of-prospect-theory/

This study compared the effectiveness of gain-, loss-, and mixed-framed messages for promoting moderate to vigorous physical activity to sedentary, healthy callers to the US National Cancer Institute’s Cancer Information Service. Results indicated that gain- and mixed-framed messages resulted in stronger intentions and greater self-efficacy than loss-framed messages in this randomized trial.

Latimer, A. E., Rench, T. A., Rivers, S. E., Elbertson, N. A., Materese, S. A., Cadmus, L. A., Salovey, P. (2008). Promoting participation in physical activity using framed messages: An application of prospect theory. British Journal of Health Psychology, 13, 659-681. doi:10.1348/135910707×246186

Tailoring messages to individual differences in monitoring-blunting styles to increase fruit and vegetable intake

(2009)
Center Authors: Latimer, A. E., Elbertson, N. A., Salovey, P.

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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/tailoring-messages-to-individual-differences-in-monitoring-blunting-styles-to-increase-fruit-and-vegetable-intake/

This study included a brief telephone-delivered message and 3 mailings of booklets and promotional items encouraging fruit and vegetable intake, to examine whether messages matched to individuals’ monitoring-blunting coping styles (MBCS) are more effective in increasing fruit and vegetable intake than mismatched messages. MBCS refers to the tendency to either attend to and amplify, or distract oneself from and minimize threatening information. Results indicate that these minimal interventions influenced fruit and vegetable intake. MBCS may be a promising target for developing tailored messages aimed at increasing intake, although additional research is needed to verify the robustness of these findings.

Williams-Piehota, P., Latimer, A. E., Elbertson, N. A., Cox, A., Silvera, S. A., Mowad, L., & Salovey, P. (2009). Tailoring messages to individual differences in monitoring-blunting styles to increase fruit and vegetable intake. Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, 41, 398-405. doi:10.1016/j.jneb.2008.06.006

School-based social and emotional learning (SEL) programming: Current perspectives

(2010)
Center Authors: Elbertson, N. A., Brackett, M. A.

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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/school-based-social-and-emotional-learning-sel-programming-current-perspectives/

This paper ddresses the history, rationale, effectiveness and implementation model of school-based SEL programming.

Elbertson, N. A., Brackett, M. A., & Weissberg, R. P. (2009). School-based social and emotional learning (SEL) programming: Current perspectives. In A. Hargreaves, M. Fullan, D. Hopkins, & A. Lieberman (Eds.), The second international handbook of educational change (pp. 1017-1032). Springer Netherlands. doi:10.1007/978-90-481-2660-6_57

Classroom emotional climate, teacher affiliation, and student conduct

(2011)
Center Authors: Brackett, M. A., Reyes, M. R., Rivers, S. E., Elbertson, N. A., Salovey, P.

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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/classroom-emotional-climate-teacher-affiliation-and-student-conduct/

This study examined the link between classroom emotional climate and student conduct, including as a mediator the role of teacher affiliation, i.e., students’ perceptions of their relationships with their teachers. As predicted, when controlling for teacher characteristics and the organizational and instructional aspects of the classroom, findings suggest there is a direct, positive relationship between classroom emotional climate and conduct that also was mediated by teacher affiliation.

Brackett, M.A., Reyes, M.R., Rivers, S.E., Elbertson, N.A., & Salovey, P. (2011). Classroom emotional climate, teacher affiliation, and student conduct. Journal of Classroom Interaction, 46, 27-36.

The interaction effects of program training, dosage, and implementation quality on targeted student outcomes for The RULER Approach to social and emotional learning

(2012)
Center Authors: Reyes, M. R., Brackett, M. A., Rivers, S. E., Elbertson, N. A., Salovey, P.

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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/the-interaction-effects-of-program-trainingdosage-and-implementation-quality-on-targeted-student-outcomes-for-the-ruler-approach-to-social-and-emotional-learning/

This study examined how training, dosage, and implementation quality of a social and emotional learning program, The RULER Approach, were related to students’ social and emotional competencies. There were no main effects for any of the variables on student outcomes, but students had more positive outcomes when their teachers (a) attended more trainings and taught more lessons, and (b) were classified as either moderate- or high-quality program implementers.

Reyes, M. R., Brackett, M. A., Rivers, S. E., Elbertson, N. A., & Salovey, P. (2012). The interaction effects of program training, dosage, and implementation quality on targeted student outcomes for The RULER Approach to social and emotional learning. School Psychology Review, 41, 82-99.

Assessing teachers’ beliefs about social and emotional learning

(2012)
Center Authors: Brackett, M. A., Reyes, M. R., Rivers, S. E., Elbertson, N. A., Salovey, P.
Topics: ,
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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/assessing-teachers-beliefs/

A tool for measuring teacher’s beliefs about SEL was developed and validated in a two-phase study. The measure can be used by school administrators to determine school readiness for SEL programming and by researchers to better understand teacher variables that impact implementation fidelity and program outcomes.

Brackett, M. A., Reyes, M. R., Rivers, S. E., Elbertson, N. A., & Salovey, P. (2012). Assessing teachers’ beliefs about social and emotional learning. Journal of Psychoeducational Assessment, 30, 219-236. doi:10.1177/0734282911424879

Improving the social and emotional climate of classrooms: A clustered randomized controlled trial testing The RULER Approach

(2012)
Center Authors: Rivers, S. E., Brackett, M. A., Reyes, M. R., Elbertson, N. A.
Topics: ,
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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/improving-the-social-and-emotional-climate-of-classrooms/

The RULER Approach is designed to modify the quality of classroom social interactions so that the climate becomes more supportive, empowering, and engaging.  Results showed that compared to classrooms in comparison schools, classrooms in RULER schools were rated as having higher degrees of warmth and connectedness between teachers and students, more autonomy and leadership among students, and teachers who focused more on students’ interests and motivations.

Rivers, S. E., Brackett, M. A., Reyes, M. R., Elbertson, N. A., & Salovey, P. (2013). Improving the social and emotional climate of classrooms: A clustered randomized controlled trial testing the RULER approach. Prevention Science, 14, 77-87. doi: 10.1007/s11121-012-0305-2

Emotional intelligence: Reconceptualizing the cognition-emotion link

(2013)
Center Authors: Brackett, M. A., Bertoli, M. C., Elbertson, N. A., Bausseron, E., Castillo-Gualda, R., Salovey, P.
Topics:
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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/emotional-intelligence-reconceptualizing-the-cognition-emotion-link/

This chapter focuses on the history of the concept of emotional intelligence and its roots in the idea that emotions may be used to facilitate cognitive processes. The role of EI in applied settings is also discussed in detail.

Brackett, M. A., Bertoli, M., Elbertson, N., Bausseron, E., Castillo, R., & Salovey, P. (2013). Emotional intelligence: Reconceptualizing the cognition-emotion link. In M. D. Robinson, E. R. Watkins, & E. Harmon-Jones (Eds.), Handbook of cognition and emotion (pp.365-379). New York, NY: Guilford Press