Author: Caruso, D. R.

Universality Versus Cultural Specificity of Three Emotion Domains: Some Evidence Based on the Cascading Model of Emotional Intelligence

(2014)
Center Authors: Caruso, D. R.

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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/universality-versus-cultural-specificity-three-emotion-domains-evidence-based-cascading-model-emotional-intelligence/

This paper focuses on distinguishing the aspects of emotions that are more universal from those that are more culture-specific. By testing the extent to which the three emotion domains in the cascading model of emotional intelligence (emotion perception, emotion understanding, and emotion regulation) are universal versus culture-specific, the researchers examined the hypotheses that emotion perception is the more universal domain of emotional intelligence, and emotion understanding and emotion regulation are more culture-specific domains.

Bo Shao, Lorna Doucet and David R. Caruso
Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology published online 6 November 2014 DOI: 10.1177/0022022114557479

A further consideration of the issues of emotional intelligence

(2004)
Center Authors: Salovey, P., Caruso, D. R.

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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/consideration-issues-emotional-intelligence/

The authors continue the discussion of emotional intelligence by addressing the points raised by the commentators on the original target article. The authors address the following concerns: theoretical issues, methodological issues, empirical issues and future directions.

Mayer, J.D., Salovey, P., & Caruso, D.R. (2004). A further consideration of the issues of emotional intelligence. Psychological Inquiry, 15, 249-255.doi:10.1207/s15327965pli1503_05

Emotional intelligence: Theory, findings, and implications

(2004)
Center Authors: Salovey, P., Caruso, D. R.

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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/emotional-intelligence-theory-findings-implications/

Scientific viability of emotional intelligence is discussed by addressing the issues of terminology, measurement, public perception through media outlets, and public criticism in this field.

Mayer, J. D., Salovey, P., & Caruso, D. R. (2004). Emotional intelligence: Theory, findings, and implications. Psychological Inquiry, 15, 197-215.

Measuring emotional intelligence as a set of abilities with the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test

(2003)
Center Authors: Salovey, P., Caruso, D. R.
Topics:
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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/measuring-emotional-intelligence-set-abilities-mayer-salovey-caruso-emotional-intelligence-test/

The authors describe two batteries they have developed to assess emotional intelligence, both organized in accord with the four-branch model: the Multifactor Emotional Intelligence scale and the Mayer-Salovey-Caurso Emotional Intelligence Test.

Salovey, P., Mayer, J. D., Caruso, D., & Lopes, P. N. (2003). Measuring emotional intelligence as a set of abilities with the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test. In S. J. Lopes & C. R. Snyder (Eds.), Positive psychological assessment: A handbook of models and measures (pp. 251-265). Washington, D.C.: American Psychological Association.

Measuring emotional intelligence with the MSCEIT V2.0

(2003)
Center Authors: Salovey, P., Caruso, D. R.

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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/measuring-emotional-intelligence-msceit-v2-0/

Using the Mayer–Salovey–Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test, the authors examined (a) whether members of a general standardization sample and emotions experts identified the same test answers as correct, (b) the test’s reliability, and (c) the possible factor structures of EI. The MSCEIT achieved reasonable reliability, and confirmatory factor analysis supported theoretical models of EI.

Mayer, J. D., Salovey, P., Caruso, D. R., & Sitarenios, G. (2003). Measuring emotional intelligence with the MSCEIT V2. 0. Emotion, 3, 97-105. doi: 10.1037/1528-3542.3.1.97

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