Author: Brackett, M. A.

Creating emotionally intelligent schools with RULER.

(2016)
Center Authors: Nathanson, L., Rivers, S. E., Flynn, L. M., Bracket M.A.

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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/creating-emotionally-intelligent-schools-ruler/

RULER, an evidence-based approach to teaching EI, provides an educational framework that encompasses a set of practices for comprehensive SEL integration across a school or district. In this article, we describe RULER, explain how it teaches EI, and summarize evidence of its effectiveness.

Nathanson, L., Rivers, S.E., Flynn, L.M., & Brackett, M.A. (2016). Creating emotionally intelligent schools with RULER. Emotion Review, 8(4), 1-6.

Predicting school success: Comparing Conscientiousness, Grit, and Emotion Regulation Ability

(2014)
Center Authors: Ivcevic, Z., Brackett, M. A.

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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/predicting-school-success-comparing-conscientiousness-grit-emotion-regulation-ability-2/

The present paper examines validity of three proposed self-regulation predictors of school outcomes – Conscientiousness, Grit and Emotion Regulation Ability (ERA). In a sample of private high school students (N = 213) we measured these constructs along with indices of school success obtained from records (rule violating behavior, academic recognitions, honors, and GPA) and self-reported satisfaction with school. Regression analyses showed that after controlling for other Big Five traits, all school outcomes were significantly predicted by Conscientiousness and ERA, but not Grit. The discussion focuses on the importance of broad personality traits (Conscientiousness; measure of typical performance) and self-regulation abilities (ERA; measure of maximal performance) in predicting school success.

“Ivcevic, Z., & Brackett, M. (2014). Predicting school success: Comparing Conscientiousness, Grit, and Emotion Regulation Ability. Journal of Research in Personality. 52, 29-36. DOI: 10.1016/j.jrp.2014.06.005”

Enhancing Teacher Effectiveness in Spain: A Pilot Study of The RULER Approach to Social and Emotional Learning

(2013)
Center Authors: Castillo-Gualda, R., Brackett, M. A., Fernandez-Berrocal, P.

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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/enhancing-teacher-effectiveness-in-spain/

This study examined the effects of an evidence-based social and emotional learning (SEL) program, The RULER Approach to Social and Emotional Learning (RULER), on teacher self reports of engagement, teacher-student interactions, and burnout. Participants were 47 teachers from 19 public schools in Spain who either volunteered for training on RULER (n = 24) or eLearning (n = 23). Multivariate Analysis of Covariance (MANCOVA) was conducted separately for each outcome. Teachers in the RULER as compared to eLearning group had significantly higher scores on many outcomes even after controlling for gender, age, trait affect, and personality, as well as pre-test scores on all outcomes. These findings extend the literature on the effectiveness of SEL programs for the improvement of teacher practices; they also advance our understanding of possible mechanisms for promoting high-quality professional development.

Castillo-Gualda, R., Fernandez-Berrocal, P., & Brackett, M.A. (2013). Enhancing teacher effectiveness in Spain: A pilot study of the RULER approach to social and emotional learning. Journal of Education and Training Studies, 1. doi: 10.11114/jets.v1i2.xxx

Predicting school success: Comparing Conscientiousness, Grit, and Emotion Regulation Ability

(2014)
Center Authors: Ivcevic, Z., Brackett, M. A.

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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/predicting-school-success-comparing-conscientiousness-grit-emotion-regulation-ability/

The present paper examines validity of three proposed self-regulation predictors of school outcomes – Conscientiousness, Grit and Emotion Regulation Ability (ERA). In a sample of private high school students (N = 213) we measured these constructs along with indices of school success obtained from records (rule violating behavior, academic recognitions, honors, and GPA) and self-reported satisfaction with school. Regression analyses showed that after controlling for other Big Five traits, all school outcomes were significantly predicted by Conscientiousness and ERA, but not Grit. The discussion focuses on the importance of broad personality traits (Conscientiousness; measure of typical performance) and self-regulation abilities (ERA; measure of maximal performance) in predicting school success.

Ivcevic, Z., & Brackett, M. (2014). Predicting school success: Comparing Conscientiousness, Grit, and Emotion Regulation Ability. Journal of Research in Personality. 52, 29-36. DOI: 10.1016/j.jrp.2014.06.005

Using computer technologies to provide relevant cancer information to vulnerable populations: The NCI Digital Divide pilot projects

(2004)
Center Authors: Salovey, P.

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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/using-computer-technologies-provide-relevant-cancer-information-vulnerable-populations-nci-digital-divide-pilot-projects/

This paper reported the results of the four innovative demonstration research projects conducted in collaboration with the Cancer Information Service to identify effective new strategies for providing access to relevant cancer information to underserved population.

Kreps, G. L., Gustafson, D. H., Salovey, P., Perocchia, R. S., Wilbright, W., Bright, M. A…., Diamond, C. C. (2004). Using computer technologies to provide relevant cancer information to vulnerable populations: The NCI Digital Divide pilot projects. In P. Whitten & D. Cook (Eds.), Understanding health communication technologies (pp. 328-336). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

The measurement of emotional intelligence in children: The case of reactive attachment disorder

(2004)
Center Authors: Brackett, M. A.

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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/measurement-emotional-intelligence-children-case-reactive-attachment-disorder/

The present research focuses on the measurement of emotional intelligence in children, exploring how it develops, and its potential importance in understanding a recently conceptualized disorder in children: Reactive Attachment Disorder.

Hall, S. E. K., Geher, G., & Brackett, M. A. (2004). The measurement of emotional intelligence in children: The case of reactive attachment disorder. In. G. Geher (Ed.), Measurement of emotional intelligence (pp. 195-214). Hauppauge, NY: Nova Science Publishers.

Integrating emotion and cognition: The role of emotional intelligence

(2004)
Center Authors: Brackett, M. A., Lopes, P., Ivcevic, Z., Salovey, P.

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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/integrating-emotion-cognition-role-emotional-intelligence/

In this chapter, the authors argue that emotional intelligence is one way to reconceptualize the relation between reason and emotion, and review emotional intelligence from a systems perspective, i.e. in a broader context of an individual’s functioning.

Brackett, M. A., Lopes, P., Ivcevic, Z., Mayer, J. D., & Salovey, P. (2004). Integrating emotion and cognition: The role of emotional intelligence. In D. Dai & R. Sternburg (Eds.), Motivation, emotion, and cognition: Integrating perspectives on intellectual functioning (pp. 175-194). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.

Emotional intelligence and social interaction

(2004)
Center Authors: Brackett, M. A., Salovey, P.

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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/emotional-intelligence-social-interaction/

Two studies found positive relationships between the ability to manage emotions and the quality of social interactions, supporting the predictive and incremental validity of an ability measure of emotional intelligence, the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT).

Lopes, P. N., Brackett, M. A., Nezlek, J. B., Schütz, A., Sellin, I., & Salovey, P. (2004). Emotional intelligence and social interaction. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 30, 1018-1034.doi: 10.1177/0146167204264762

Emotional intelligence and its relation to everyday behaviour

(2004)
Center Authors: Brackett, M. A.

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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/emotional-intelligence-relation-everyday-behaviour/

This study assessed the discriminant, criterion and incremental validity of an ability measure of emotional intelligence. In this college students’ sample, EI was significantly associated with maladjustment and negative behaviours for college-aged males, but not for females.

Brackett, M. A., Mayer, J. D., & Warner, R. M. (2004). Emotional intelligence and its relation to everyday behaviour. Personality and Individual Differences, 36, 1387-1402. doi:10.1016/S0191-8869(03)00236-8

Measuring emotional intelligence with the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT)

(2006)
Center Authors: Brackett, M. A., Salovey, P.

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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/measuring-emotional-intelligence-mayer-salovey-caruso-emotional-intelligence-test-msceit/

This chapter discusses considerations for measuring emotional intelligence with the MSCEIT.

Brackett, M. A., & Salovey, P. (2006). Measuring emotional intelligence with the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT). In. G. Geher (Ed.), Measurement of emotional intelligence (pp. 179-194). Hauppauge, NY: Nova Science Publishers. Reprinted in 2006 in Spanish in Psichothema.

Emotional intelligence and the self-regulation of affect

(2006)
Center Authors: Brackett, M. A., Salovey, P.

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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/emotional-intelligence-self-regulation-affect/

The chapter discusses the differences and similarities between the ability and mixed models of EI, most specifically the issues regarding the ability and self-report measurement of EI.

Grewal, D., Brackett, M. A., & Salovey, P. (2006). Emotional intelligence and the self-regulation of affect. In. D. K. Snyder, J. A. Simpson, & J. N. Hughes (Eds.), Emotion regulation in couples and families (pp. 37-55). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

Emotional intelligence in the classroom: Skill-based training for teachers and students

(2006)
Center Authors: Brackett, M. A., Elbertson, N. A.

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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/emotional-intelligence-classroom-skill-based-training-teachers-students/

In this chapter, the authors describe two programs that fulfill CASEL’s requirements for social-emotional learning programs, and also are compatible with mandates set by No Child Left Behind (NCLB). Both programs are anchored in EI theory: The Emotionally Intelligent Teacher and the Emotional Literacy in the Middle School.

Brackett, M. A., & Elbertson, N. A. (2006). Emotional intelligence in the classroom: Skill-based training for teachers and students. In J. Ciarrochi & J. D. Mayer (Eds.), Improving emotional intelligence: A practitioner’s guide (pp. 1-27). New York: Psychology Press/Taylor & Francis.

Measuring emotional intelligence: Paradigmatic diversity and common ground

(2006)
Center Authors: Brackett, M. A.

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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/measuring-emotional-intelligence-paradigmatic-diversity-common-ground/

This manuscript examines the measurement instrument developed from the ability model of EI, the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test. The paper examines the MSCEIT, its subtests, scoring method, psychometric properties, reliability, and factor structure. The authors encourage several lines of research under their EI model using the MSCEIT.

Brackett, M. A., & Geher, G. (2006). Measuring emotional intelligence: Paradigmatic diversity and common ground. In J. Ciarrochi, J. P. Forgas & J. D. Mayer (Eds.), Emotional intelligence in everyday life (2nd ed.) (pp. 27-50). New York, NY: Psychology Press.

Frequency of positive affect as a possible mediator between perceived emotional intelligence and life satisfaction

(2006)
Center Authors: Palomera, R., Brackett, M. A.

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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/frequency-positive-affect-possible-mediator-perceived-emotional-intelligence-life-satisfaction/

This study examined the incremental validity of Perceived Emotional Intelligence (PEI) as measured by the Trait Meta-Mood Scale on the prediction of life satisfaction after controlling for personality and affect, which are known to be related to well-being, among Spanish students. The results show the necessity of controlling for positive and negative affect independently and differentiating between intensity and frequency of affect when evaluating the incremental validity of PEI in the prediction of life satisfaction.

Palomera, R., & Brackett, M. A. (2006). Frequency of positive affect as a possible mediator between perceived emotional intelligence and life satisfaction. Ansiedad y Estres, 12, 231-239.

Relating emotional intelligence to social competence and academic achievement in high school students

(2006)
Center Authors: Palomera, R., Brackett, M. A.

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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/relating-emotional-intelligence-social-competence-academic-achievement-high-school-students/

This study investigated the discriminant, criterion and incremental validity of an ability measure of Emotional Intelligence (EI), the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test – Spanish Version. As predicted, the MSCEIT was discriminable from well-established measures of personality and intelligence.

Gil-Olarte Márquez, P., Palomera Martín, R., & Brackett, M. A. (2006). Relating emotional intelligence to social competence and academic achievement in high school students. Psicothema, 18(Suplemento), 118-123.