Alumni

Monika Lohani, Ph.D.

Monika Lohani, Ph.D.

Monika Lohani, Ph.D., is a postdoctoral research associate at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence. She investigates: (1) efficient ways to manage ongoing social and personal crises; (2) intervention programs for emotional health; (3) the effects and mechanisms of contemplative practices on emotional and cognitive functioning in healthy and clinical populations; and (4) individual and group differences in socioemotional cognition. At the Center, Monika studies how people can develop emotional intelligence skills through virtual interactions, as well as how those interactions affect trust and reliance on computer systems (PIs: Drs. Susan Rivers and Charlene Stokes). This research incorporates multimodal assessment (e.g., self-report, facial analysis, EEG, EDA, HRV, and eye-tracking) and a validated emotional skills dialog paradigm (RULER) to explore the risks and benefits associated with virtual interactions. Monika received the Francisco Varela Award for Contemplative Sciences from the Mind and Life Institute to do an intervention study that combines psychophysiological, behavioral, and experience sampling assessments to measure the effect of two specific meditation techniques (Open Monitoring and Focused Attention). The goal of that project is to decipher the underlying mechanisms through which such techniques improve emotion regulation skills in mildly depressed individuals. Monika is now exploring several exciting lines of multidisciplinary research to optimize psychosocial health outcomes across the lifespan. Monika earned her M.A. in cognitive science from the Center for Behavioural and Cognitive Sciences, India, and her M.A. and Ph.D. in social developmental psychology from Brandeis   read more

Susan Rivers, Ph.D.

Susan Rivers, Ph.D.

Susan Rivers, Ph.D., is co-founder of the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence and a visiting research scientist in the Department of Psychology. She received her B.A. from Skidmore College and her M.S., M.Phil., and Ph.D. from Yale. Until recently, she served as founding deputy director for the Center and is now Executive Director at iThrive, a nonprofit that uses digital games to promote social and emotional skill building in adolescents (ithrivegames.org). Susan is a co-developer of RULER, an approach to teach adults and children the skills of emotional intelligence: recognizing, understanding, labeling, expressing, and regulating emotions. With support from federal and foundation grants, her research tests the impacts of RULER. This intervention, designed to teach emotional intelligence to children, relies on first teaching the adults who surround children in schools (i.e., teachers, principals, and school staff) to appreciate the significance of their own and their students emotions, to value the importance of emotional intelligence, to learn and model these skills, and to support, teach, and encourage students to develop their skills. RULER is designed to be part of the everyday routine of teaching and learning; it is infused into the curriculum, not taught as a separate lesson or set of activities. Rigorous evaluations of RULER show significant, positive effects. With RULER training, classroom climates improve, teachers teach more effectively, and students are more engaged in learning and perform better. Tens of thousands of teachers have been trained in RULER, reaching hundreds of thousands of students across the globe. The Institute for Education Sciences funded Susan and her colleagues to develop Preschool RULER, an adaptation of the approach for our youngest learners in early childhood classrooms. Pilot tests of Preschool RULER are promising, showing that teachers and children enjoy the approach, and children’s skills in emotion labeling and understanding are improving. Newer work Susan is leading focuses on transforming emotional intelligence training to be delivered in games, virtual worlds, and social robotics. Susan works with collaborators across industries and disciplines to explore how to leverage technologies that are appealing to both children and adults in order to help develop emotional awareness and emotion regulation skills across a variety of contexts including STEM learning in middle school students, literacy and conflict resolution in elementary school, design making and team work in young adults, and health and well-being amongst young adults in the military. One goal of this work is to embed emotional intelligence training into activities that people enjoy doing (i.e., to sneak it in). The Recognizing Excellence in Learning and Teaching (RELATE) project emerged from work funded by the William T. Grant Foundation and aims to identify effective teaching and learning practices in classrooms that serve children with learning differences.   read more

Shauna Tominey, Ph.D.

Shauna Tominey, Ph.D.

Shauna Tominey, Ph.D., is a consultant at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence and an Assistant Professor of Practice at Oregon State University.  As a former director of early childhood programming and teacher education for RULER, she supports projects related to Preschool RULER and RULER’s early childhood efforts. Dr. Tominey holds undergraduate degrees in music and psychology from the University of Washington, an M.S. in family studies and human services from Kansas State University, and a Ph.D. in human development and family sciences from Oregon State   read more

Christina Cipriano Crowe, Ph.D.

Christina Cipriano Crowe, Ph.D.

Christina Cipriano Crowe, Ph.D., is a postdoctoral research associate for the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence. She is the project director for Yale’s Recognizing Excellence in Learning and Teaching (RELATE) Project, which looks at classrooms that serve students with various learning needs. Additionally, she is conducting research on adolescent transitions to middle school to better understand the effect of classroom quality on positive youth development. Christina’s research focuses on the intersection of research and practice in child development. She primarily examines longitudinal trajectories of micro family processes, school socialization pathways, and child academic and socioemotional outcomes, with particular emphasis on the cumulative developmental deprivation of poverty and low levels of education. Furthermore, Christina is using advanced statistical techniques to examine such trajectories. Christina received her undergraduate degrees in political science and education from Hofstra University. As a Cooke Fellow, Christina earned an Ed.M in International Education Policy from the Harvard Graduate School of Education, a Certificate in Human Rights and International Justice from Boston College Law School, and a Ph.D. in Applied Developmental and Educational Psychology from the Boston College Lynch School of   read more

Lindsay Duncan, Ph.D.

Lindsay Duncan, Ph.D.

Lindsay Duncan, Ph.D., a former postdoctoral research associate at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence, joined the Department of Kinesiology and Physical Education at McGill University as an assistant professor in August of 2013. Lindsay’s research draws from both social- and health-psychological perspectives and is focused on developing and testing interventions designed to increase the initiation and maintenance of health behaviors in the general population as well as among medically underserved individuals and cancer survivors. At the Center, among other projects, Lindsay contributed to the evaluation of the Healthy Eating for Life Curriculum for adults who were medically underserved and were students in an English as a Second or Other Language course. She also conducted studies examining the application of socioemotional selectivity theory to health messaging efforts for cancer survivors. Lindsay has a keen interest in health promotion research as it applies to a wide variety of health behaviors including physical activity, healthy eating, HIV prevention, and smoking cessation. Lindsay earned her B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. in kinesiology from the University of Western   read more

Lance Linke, Ph.D.

Lance Linke, Ph.D.

Lance H. Linke, Ph.D., is an associate research scientist in the Division of Prevention and Community Research, Department of Psychiatry, at Yale University School of Medicine. Dr. Linke has trained as a developmental and educational psychologist with a concentration on cognitive and emotional information processing components of affective-regulation. Along with Mike Strambler, Lance co-directs a collaborative project between Bridgeport Public Schools, Yale School of Medicine, and Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence aimed at promoting social and emotional learning which includes implementation of RULER. Lance also is a collaborator on the innovations in emotional intelligence skill building project. Dr. Linke has worked internationally with departments and ministries of health and education to create interdisciplinary, collaborative frameworks that focus on the importance of emotional development in education environments. His research concomitantly aims to understand how people in various cultures perceive and interpret the world, and how these perceptions and interpretations influence behavior. He continues to evaluate the development of emotion regulation, and the many variables that influence this, with respect to academic, interpersonal, and intrapersonal   read more

Elisabeth O’Bryon, Ph.D.

Elisabeth O’Bryon, Ph.D.

Elisabeth O’Bryon, Ph.D., is a research affiliate with the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence, and the Director of Research and Evaluation at GreatSchools, an organization that uses digital media to help parents get a great education for their children. Previously, Elisabeth worked with the RULER for Families team at the Center to explore how schools can use emotional intelligence to connect with families and build stronger school-home relationships. Elisabeth has experience providing school psychological services to preschool through high school-age students. Her research has focused on how to promote the educational success of students identified as English language learners, as well as ways to support home-school partnerships with culturally and linguistically diverse families. In 2012, Elisabeth received the University of Rhode Island Excellence in Doctoral Research Award and an award from the University of Rhode Island Psychology Department for Graduate Student Excellence in the Multicultural Focus Area. Elisabeth received her B.A. in Psychology from Hamilton College, and her M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in School Psychology from the University of Rhode   read more

Catalina Torrente, Ph.D.

Catalina Torrente, Ph.D.

Catalina Torrente, Ph.D., is a postdoctoral research associate at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence. Her research interests center on identifying effective ways to support vulnerable children’s positive development through evidence-based school interventions. At the Center, she is developing and piloting a set of measures to assess the implementation of RULER. Prior to coming to Yale, Catalina served as the project director of a cluster-randomized impact evaluation of Opportunities for Equitable Access to Quality Basic Education (OPEQ), a school-based intervention developed and implemented by the International Rescue Committee in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (http://steinhardt.nyu.edu/ihdsc/opeq). She also worked as a research assistant and analyst for the control-randomized trial of the Reading, Writing, Respect and Resolution (4Rs) program. Catalina received her B.S. in psychology and anthropology from Universidad de los Andes in Colombia, and her Ph.D. in developmental psychology from New York   read more

Mrinalini Rao, Ph.D.

Mrinalini Rao, Ph.D.

Mrinalini A. Rao, Ph.D., is a postdoctoral research associate at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence. Mrinalini’s research experience and interests lie at the intersection of developmental, counseling, and clinical psychology. Her research focuses on the developmental impact of interpersonal violence and aggression among adolescents, the prevention of interpersonal violence, and the promotion of positive youth development. Mrinalini is also interested in developmental methodologies and advanced statistical techniques. She is applying these interests to a collaborative project with Facebook Inc. examining adolescents’ social interactions online, particularly cyberbullying and other negative social experiences on the social networking website. Mrinalini received her B.A. in psychology from Fergusson College, Pune, India, and an M.A. in clinical psychology from the University of Pune, India. As an Illinois Distinguished Fellow she earned an M.S. and Ph.D. in counseling psychology from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. She completed an APA-accredited predoctoral internship at the University of Maryland, College Park where she provided individual and group therapy as well as psychological assessments to adolescents and young   read more

Sherri Widen, Ph.D.

Sherri Widen, Ph.D.

Sherri Widen, Ph.D., is an associate research scientist for the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence. At the Center, she works on testing Preschool RULER, an approach to early childhood education that integrates emotional intelligence into the lives of children, teachers, administrators, and family members. Sherri also leads the Center’s assessment project which designs assessment tools and practices to measure the impacts of RULER from preschool through high school for practitioners and researchers. Sherri brings her expertise on children’s understanding of emotion to each of these projects. Sherri has an innovative perspective on children’s emotional development, positing that children have a fundamentally different way of understanding emotions than adults. Her research helps the Center address children’s developmental needs appropriately. She holds a B.A. in psychology and M.A. in developmental psychology from the University of British Columbia, and a Ph.D. in developmental psychology from Boston   read more

Jeremy Yip, Ph.D.

Jeremy Yip, Ph.D.

Jeremy Yip, Ph.D., is a former postdoctoral research associate at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence. His research examines the influence of emotions on decisions, and the role of emotional intelligence in decision-making. He has published his research in Psychological Science, and regularly presents his research at the Academy of Management conference. Jeremy’s dissertation research garnered a dissertation proposal award from the Academy of Management and the Society for Human Resource Management, along with Canadian national and provincial fellowships. He also designed and taught an undergraduate business course called the Socially Intelligent Manager at the University of Toronto, where he received an Excellence in Teaching Award. Jeremy earned his undergraduate degrees with honors in business administration and psychology at the University of Western Ontario. He earned his Ph.D. in organizational behavior from the Rotman School of Management at the University of Toronto. Jeremy is now a Lecturer and Research Scholar at the Wharton School of the University of   read more