Publications

Universality Versus Cultural Specificity of Three Emotion Domains: Some Evidence Based on the Cascading Model of Emotional Intelligence

(2014)
Center Authors: Caruso, D. R.

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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/universality-versus-cultural-specificity-three-emotion-domains-evidence-based-cascading-model-emotional-intelligence/

This paper focuses on distinguishing the aspects of emotions that are more universal from those that are more culture-specific. By testing the extent to which the three emotion domains in the cascading model of emotional intelligence (emotion perception, emotion understanding, and emotion regulation) are universal versus culture-specific, the researchers examined the hypotheses that emotion perception is the more universal domain of emotional intelligence, and emotion understanding and emotion regulation are more culture-specific domains.

Bo Shao, Lorna Doucet and David R. Caruso
Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology published online 6 November 2014 DOI: 10.1177/0022022114557479

Children’s Positive School Behaviors and Social Preference

(2014)
Center Authors: Torrente, C.E.

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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/childrens-positive-school-behaviors-social-preference/

This study examined the associations between prosocial and academically oriented behaviors and social preference as a function of individual (i.e., gender), developmental (i.e., grade) and contextual factors (i.e., group descriptive norms). Data were gathered from a sample of 2nd, 3rd and 4th grade children (51% male, 97.5% African American) in 34 classrooms from high-poverty inner-city neighborhoods. Multilevel analyses indicated that individual, developmental, and contextual factors moderated the association between children’s prosocial and academically oriented behaviors and social preference. Taken together, results from this study support theoretical models emphasizing the relational and contextual nature of children’s social preference in the peer group.

Torrente, C.E., Cappella, E. & Watling Neal, J. (2014). Children’s positive school behaviors and social preference. Journal of Community Psychology, 42(2), 143-161.DOI: 10.1002/jcop.21599

Predicting school success: Comparing Conscientiousness, Grit, and Emotion Regulation Ability

(2014)
Center Authors: Ivcevic, Z., Brackett, M. A.

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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/predicting-school-success-comparing-conscientiousness-grit-emotion-regulation-ability-2/

The present paper examines validity of three proposed self-regulation predictors of school outcomes – Conscientiousness, Grit and Emotion Regulation Ability (ERA). In a sample of private high school students (N = 213) we measured these constructs along with indices of school success obtained from records (rule violating behavior, academic recognitions, honors, and GPA) and self-reported satisfaction with school. Regression analyses showed that after controlling for other Big Five traits, all school outcomes were significantly predicted by Conscientiousness and ERA, but not Grit. The discussion focuses on the importance of broad personality traits (Conscientiousness; measure of typical performance) and self-regulation abilities (ERA; measure of maximal performance) in predicting school success.

“Ivcevic, Z., & Brackett, M. (2014). Predicting school success: Comparing Conscientiousness, Grit, and Emotion Regulation Ability. Journal of Research in Personality. 52, 29-36. DOI: 10.1016/j.jrp.2014.06.005″

Emotion and Altruism

(1981)
Center Authors: Salovey, P.

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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/emotion-altruism/

This chapter reviews and integrates the experimental and theoretical literature on the effects of emotion on altruism.

Rosenhan, D. L., Salovey, P., Karylowski, J., & Hargis, K. (1981). Emotion and altruism. In J. P. Rushton & R. M. Sorrentino (Eds.), Altruism and helping behavior (pp. 233-248). Hillsdale: Erlbaum.

Improving classroom quality with The RULER Approach to social and emotional learning: Proximal and distal outcomes

(2013)
Center Authors: Castillo-Gualda, R., Brackett, M. A.

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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/improving-classroom-quality-ruler-approach-social-emotional-learning-proximal-distal-outcomes/

The RULER Approach is designed to improve the quality of classroom interactions through professional development and classroom curricula that infuse emotional literacy instruction into teaching–learning interactions. A 2-year, cluster randomized controlled trial was conducted to test hypotheses derived from this theory.  Findings highlight the important contribution of emotional literacy training and development in creating engaging, empowering, and productive learning environments.

Hagelskamp, C., Brackett, M. A., Rivers, S. E., & Salovey, P. (2013). Improving classroom quality with the RULER approach to social and emotional learning: Proximal and distal outcomes. American Journal of Community Psychology, 1-14. doi: 10.1007/s10464-013-9570-x

Predicting school success: Comparing Conscientiousness, Grit, and Emotion Regulation Ability

(2014)
Center Authors: Ivcevic, Z., Brackett, M. A.

DOWNLOAD
http://ei.yale.edu/publication/predicting-school-success-comparing-conscientiousness-grit-emotion-regulation-ability/

The present paper examines validity of three proposed self-regulation predictors of school outcomes – Conscientiousness, Grit and Emotion Regulation Ability (ERA). In a sample of private high school students (N = 213) we measured these constructs along with indices of school success obtained from records (rule violating behavior, academic recognitions, honors, and GPA) and self-reported satisfaction with school. Regression analyses showed that after controlling for other Big Five traits, all school outcomes were significantly predicted by Conscientiousness and ERA, but not Grit. The discussion focuses on the importance of broad personality traits (Conscientiousness; measure of typical performance) and self-regulation abilities (ERA; measure of maximal performance) in predicting school success.

Ivcevic, Z., & Brackett, M. (2014). Predicting school success: Comparing Conscientiousness, Grit, and Emotion Regulation Ability. Journal of Research in Personality. 52, 29-36. DOI: 10.1016/j.jrp.2014.06.005

Clinical information processing: Bias inoculation

(1986)
Center Authors: Salovey, P.

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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/clinical-information-processing-bias-inoculation/

This chapter discusses common sources of bias in clinical judgement.

Turk, D. C., & Salovey, P. (1986). Clinical information processing: Bias inoculation. In R. E. Ingram (Ed.), Information processing approaches to clinical psychology (pp. 305-323). Orlando: Academic Press.

Three ways to look at jealousy. [Review of N. Friday, Jealousy.]

(1986)
Center Authors: Salovey, P.

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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/three-ways-look-jealousy-review-n-friday-jealousy/

A book review of “Jealousy,” by N. Friday.

Salovey, P. (1986). Three ways to look at jealousy. [Review of N. Friday, Jealousy.] Imagination, Cognition, and Personality, 6, 190-192.

Implicit models of illness

(1986)
Center Authors: Salovey, P.

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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/implicit-models-illness/

This study investigated the implicit models of illness (i.e., the dimensional structure that organizes an individual’s common-sense illness schema). Factor analysis revealed a 4-dimensional structure of illnesses composed of Seriousness, Personal Responsibility, Controllability, and Changeability. The dimensions identified seemed to be both personally and psychologically meaningful.

Turk, D. C., Rudy, T. E., & Salovey, P. (1986). Implicit models of illness. Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 9, 453-473. doi: 10.1007/BF00845133

The differentiation of social-comparison jealousy and romantic jealousy

(1986)
Center Authors: Salovey, P.

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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/differentiation-social-comparison-jealousy-romantic-jealousy/

This study investigated the differences between social-comparison jealousy and romantic jealousy. Findings support a view that sees more value in differentiating situations that evoke jealousy than in attempting to differentiate the experience of jealousy vs envy.

Salovey, P., & Rodin, J. (1986). The differentiation of social-comparison jealousy and romantic jealousy. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 50, 1100-1112. doi: 10.1037/0022-3514.50.6.1100


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