In The News

Mummy is Having a ‘Yellow Day’, Thanks for Asking

Mummy is Having a ‘Yellow Day’, Thanks for Asking

Posted on Feb 29, 2016

The Telegraph ~ February 27th, 2016 | Moments after I had given birth to my third child, my husband handed me my mobile phone. Our eldest son, Hector, three, was calling. “How are you, Mummy?” he asked. “How are you feeling?” He wasn’t being polite. He was genuinely interested in my emotional state. “Happy,” I replied. “I’m excited about introducing you to your new brother.” It’s his nursery’s fault. His teachers are encouraging children as young as two-and-a-half to talk openly about their moods and emotions. As a result, Hector is constantly asking me if I’m happy or sad. He tells me if something or someone upsets him (often with tear-jerking honesty) and when his younger brother, Alfie, two, steals his Lego, he will admit that he wants to “smash and bash” him. I take this as my cue to intervene. Full Article … read more

Will Facebook’s New Reactions Reduce Written Comments?

Will Facebook’s New Reactions Reduce Written Comments?

Posted on Feb 26, 2016

San Jose Mercury News ~ February 26th, 2016 | I have mixed feelings about Facebook's new Reactions product. On one hand, I applaud the company for offering users a wider range of emotional responses they can easily make to other people's posts but I worry that it might cause some to make fewer comments the old-fashioned way, by typing their original thoughts. Until Wednesday, the only way you could acknowledge a person's post with a single click was to "like" it. That's fine for responding to something positive, but not if the person just posted that his dog died or that she got laid off from her job. With the new Reactions, you can now hover over the Like button and also choose Love, Haha, Wow, Sad or Angry. Full Article … read more

How to Help Your Child Develop Executive Function and Self-Regulation Skills

How to Help Your Child Develop Executive Function and Self-Regulation Skills

Posted on Feb 24, 2016

Noodle.com ~ February 24th, 2016 |  The refrains from the traditional games that many of us played as children — and that many children play today — are not just the sounds of children having fun. They are also the sounds of children learning! The skills children practice when playing these games are not only important on the playground, but also in social and educational settings. Why? At the heart of each of these games is a crucial skill: executive functioning. Executive functioning has three components: Attentional flexibility: the ability to pay attention to instructions, ignore distractions, and switch focus from one task or person to another (e.g., listening expressly for the words “Simon Says”) Working memory: the ability to keep information in your mind long enough to follow through with instructions (e.g., remembering to stay still if tagged “duck” and to run if tagged “goose”) Inhibitory control: the ability to stop and respond in a way that might feel less natural, but is more appropriate (e.g., refraining from disregarding the wishes of the “mother” when those differ from what is requested) Full Article Here … read more

‘Star Trek’ Actress To Return Home To West Haven To Talk About Bullying

Posted on Jan 11, 2016

The New Haven Register ~ January 8th, 2016 | The inaugural Educational Leadership Series: School Climate and Public Policy forum will take place Thursday at the Savin Rock Conference Center.  The forum, organized by Board of Education member Patricia Libero and state Rep. Charles Ferraro, R-West Haven, is for leaders of the state’s school districts, legislators, state education officials and others who shape school policy. Dr. Marc Brackett will explain the RULER initiative, which teaches staff and student participants about feelings, developing a vocabulary to discuss feelings, and coping mechanisms on how to handle those feelings. RULER is an acronym that stands for Recognizing, Understanding, Labeling, Expressing and Regulating emotions. <a href="https://adclick.g.doubleclick.net/pcs/click?xai=AKAOjstYZ-nZztHnfInqETpD_R8GjBT4txHBq9NE2f75Sl3Vcpw8ZQuzwHjP7DoUdXyRaJwGLTc12ULVGKwDU44ET3oov7eWYPp8cogJ3bV5dDuovmYN2d5y3MaSIuVEMzDjRZ4jWGZP5CLwgs8hGttcsrmNbsf_fG-lFNNtNKPtq-7vNFMfyWs31nBC3r0KLvFnko0I03j5bAI5A9vllaPmlI2Mg2zYGRsSdzrLj2qKzqgD4QAhS62ZQSrc1PjdKLK7dCdwHdaOl_mgK-2awlEfYqQxzcKapx-A7EQXxomZIf41mUVFjmsHmEPSSCmB6spWAwpTUN2DyPItyFz309m6nci2i2oL95gpVdlcgOmCBDq5CddJT6CKJWsVTUHR_xkraCqCKkdgF-YWpfRnJ14waHh_JHbIzU6p7E7Yu9NLhLiPLwmlw8cYw0l7iw03xE92gNps926heq7av1_Ni5-Wd0pLwPezUVfwBLUSVQwzP4kG5vYuvEeNyPualuSsu-4Jf2k9kMUnk33m2mkQShtEiIk50rdQzffmRuCPrMloS1CrKKnjBPxulvYCuXKJkUM9OnAJ4pJk701mliCDLXa53lWrSeCb4K99ef5frjjlHu14ltdZ9ML__ku-ygv52Jl9OlRF5VxUqu8Hz-2TJSlRjAOr_H1b38BZMQNO37RHElygxQr92RvTNUX5flUWO0O-JoZxMdZXN6FdnIdeIAdtOu5J-n5mAi-S4IxT6wjWR4_pkcIf7QG_HID4&sig=Cg0ArKJSzJMOpGkpM0nyEAE&urlfix=1&adurl=https://store.nest.com/product/thermostat%3Futm_campaign%3Dnest-cam%26utm_medium%3Dbanner%26utm_source%3Dgoogle%26utm_content%3Den-ha-na-gdn-RMKT" target="_blank"><img border="0" style="display:block; margin-left:auto; margin-right:auto" alt="Backup Image" src="https://s1.2mdn.net/4385305/NestThermo_PostHoliday_Message3_EN_300x250_Static.jpg" /></a> Full Article Here  … read more

Shauna Tominey: A Hero Who Made a Difference this Year

Shauna Tominey: A Hero Who Made a Difference this Year

Posted on Dec 27, 2015

Shauna Tominey, a research scientist and director of early childhood programming and teacher education at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence, focuses on building social skills and resilience in children from underprivileged families — cutting-edge areas of concern as it becomes increasingly apparent that education achievement gaps cannot be closed through academics alone. Read full … read more

How to Create Safe Learning Environments

How to Create Safe Learning Environments

Posted on Dec 9, 2015

EducationWeek ~ December 9th, 2015 | A few weeks ago, a high school sophomore in South Carolina received national attention after being caught using her phone during math class. Social media was abuzz with outraged comments as the world witnessed on video a white male police officer flip the black female student in her desk and drag her to the front of the room. People were talking about how the student is yet another black victim of police brutality. People were talking about how she is a teenage girl who was assaulted by an adult male. People were talking about how this is yet another example of the mounting racial tensions in schools across the nation. We'd like to draw your attention to the classroom teacher. Over the past four years, our group, the Recognizing Excellence in Learning and Teaching Project, known as RELATE and funded by the William T. Grant Foundation, has taken an in-depth look at the most volatile of classrooms—those primarily serving students with emotional and behavioral disorders. These are the students least likely to graduate and most likely to enter the juvenile-justice system. Their teachers, we found, are also more likely to intervene on behalf of their students. Full Article … read more

College Students Say Support Outside Class Is Key To Success

College Students Say Support Outside Class Is Key To Success

Posted on Nov 30, 2015

WNPR.org ~ November 27th, 2015 | Carol Ortega is a nursing major at the University of St. Joseph. As the first in her family to go to college, she said it’s important that counselors and professors show their human side to students. "You guys can’t ask us to put our walls down if you guys aren’t either," Ortega said. "That's really powerful for me." Social and emotional well-being has become an issue of growing concern. It’s led to programs such as the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence, as well as proposed federal legislation that would provide money to train teachers on how to incorporate social and emotional learning into classroom lessons. Full Article … read more

Gratitude Can Transform Your Life. Here’s How.

Gratitude Can Transform Your Life. Here’s How.

Posted on Nov 30, 2015

The Huffington Post Blog ~ November 26th, 2015 |  There are moments in life when gratitude sneaks up on us. You step out of the freezing winter cold and into a warm cafe. Your phone buzzes, and you see a text from your daughter saying her plane has landed and she can't wait to see you. These pockets of joy and relief fill us up in the moment and then typically pass. And we could be doing much more to reap their benefits throughout our day and throughout our lives. According to researchers, the full experience of gratitude is more than a passing emotion. It's a state of mind that we can cultivate daily -- even regardless of our life circumstances. Robin Stern, associate director of the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence, and Robert Emmons, psychology professor at University of California, Davis, discuss the benefits of giving thanks in their book Gratitude as a Psychotherapeutic Intervention. Full Article … read more

Teaching Peace In Elementary School

Teaching Peace In Elementary School

Posted on Nov 16, 2015

NYTimes Sunday Review ~ November 14th, 2015 | For years, there has been a steady stream of headlines about the soaring mental health needs of college students and their struggles with anxiety and lack of resilience. Now, a growing number of educators are trying to bolster emotional competency not on college campuses, but where they believe it will have the greatest impact: in elementary schools. In many communities, elementary teachers, guidance counselors and administrators are embracing what is known as social and emotional learning, or S.E.L., a process through which people become more aware of their feelings and learn to relate more peacefully to others. Feeling left out? Angry at your mom? Embarrassed to speak out loud during class? Proponents of S.E.L. say these feelings aren’t insignificant issues to be ignored in favor of the three R’s. Unless emotions are properly dealt with, they believe, children won’t be able to reach their full academic potential. Full Article … read more

Dena Simmons of the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence Presents TED Talk in New York City

Dena Simmons of the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence Presents TED Talk in New York City

Posted on Nov 12, 2015

On November 1st and 2nd, Dr. Dena Simmons presented at the inaugural TED Talks Live at the Town Hall Theater in New York City’s Theater district under the umbrella topic of “The Education Revolution.” Dena’s talk drew from her life experiences as a student, teacher, researcher, and activist, in an attempt to engage the audience in a discourse about race, power, and privilege in our nation’s education system. Dena put forth the belief that if educational initiatives for students are to be successful, these initiatives must address the history of racism and inequality that perpetuates an unsustainable cycle that disadvantages some students--mainly students of color. Further, she pushed the audience to consider the emotional danger students experience when they are forced to erase who they are in order to experience success at school. Dena currently works as the Director of Implementation at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence, where she oversees education, training, and coaching initiatives at the Center as well as the scaling up of the RULER program, the Center’s approach to social and emotional learning. Photo Credit - Ryan Lash … read more