In The News

For families: How to respond to our young people

For families: How to respond to our young people

Posted on Nov 11, 2016

At the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence, we recommend that you check in with your own feelings first.  Name what you feel, and use a strategy – maybe deep breathing— to calm your own emotions in order to be available for a conversation with your child. Then, listen to your child’s feelings and validate them. Create space for them to ask questions, and listen deeply to their concerns. One particular concern we’ve heard quite a bit so far is: “How does a man who says mean things get to be the President?” Here are some thoughts to guide your conversations: Not all people/families feel the same way about how wrong it is to say mean things. Then, you can share what your family feels. Remind your child of your family values and the type of behavior you expect them to engage in despite what is being modeled in the media. Share that it is likely that many people thought that Trump didn’t mean everything he said or that he will change for the better now that he is president-elect. What can you do when talking is over? Your family and you have the right to decide how you want to feel and how you want to act all of the time.  Our tool, the Charter, can help to create this written “agreement” of feelings and behaviors as a family. The Charter details the specific feelings you want to feel and what you will ‘do’ to ensure that everyone can have those feelings. You can also share how you will continue to do good work to make the world a better place. Then, ask your child how she/he can be a helper in her/his world. Another question we are hearing is: “How do we ‘fix’ all of the hurt feelings in the country? How do we help people to talk to each other?” Start by listening and talking to each other … read more

Yale School of Medicine releases report on social and emotional learning in Bridgeport Public Schools

Posted on Nov 8, 2016

Michael Strambler, PhD, and Joanna Meyer, MAT, from Yale School of Medicine at The Consultation Center on November 2 released an initial evaluation report on the district-wide Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) Initiative in Bridgeport. SEL is the process of developing personal and inter-personal knowledge and skills related to feelings, thoughts and behaviors. During the first year of classroom-level programming, Strambler and Meyer found evidence that SEL tools were becoming a regular part of classroom instruction. The team also found evidence supporting the relationship of student outcomes such as academic grades, attendance, and rates of suspensions and expulsions with student perceptions of positive school climate and their own SEL skills. Student self-assessments of behavior regulation had the strongest and most consistent association. Bridgeport’s SEL initiative began in the 2013-2014 school year, when Strambler and colleagues partnered with the Wilbur Cross School to implement the RULER Approach, a social and emotional learning program developed at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence. The RULER Approach focuses on teaching students and adults to Recognize, Understand, Label, Express and Regulate emotions. This initiative grew to become a district-wide effort when Interim Superintendent Fran Rabinowitz joined the district in March 2014, and the Yale-BPS SEL Partnership was formed. School leaders and district administers spent the 2014-2015 school year preparing for district-wide implementation of RULER, including participating in a Leadership Development program, launching an SEL task force, forming a RULER team at each school, and participating in RULER training. Schools began to introduce students to RULER during the 2015-2016 school year, with the support of the district’s SEL facilitators. Bridgeport’s SEL initiative was featured in an independent report on SEL efforts in three U.S. school districts. The Consultation Center’s evaluation of RULER draws on data from the district’s annual School Climate Survey for students, RULER Implementation Surveys and Logs completed by school personnel, and de-identified student data from district records. Data from the 2015-2016 school … read more

Today’s Students May Be Emotionally Unprepared

Today’s Students May Be Emotionally Unprepared

Posted on Jun 23, 2016

New York Times ~ June 23, 2016 | Regardless of all the honors classes and A.P. courses they took in high school, or the science, technology and engineering classes they cram into their college curriculum, students today will not be fully prepared to compete in an increasingly global business environment. The problem — and the solution — is not intellectual. It’s emotional. Read Full … read more

Emotions Expert From Yale Imparts Wise Insights In Trumbull Talk

Emotions Expert From Yale Imparts Wise Insights In Trumbull Talk

Posted on Apr 25, 2016

Trumbull Daily Voice ~ April 25th, 2016 | FAIRFIELD, Conn. — Hundreds of parents and students packed the Trumbull High School auditorium for a lively session on emotional intelligence and how knowing how to recognize and regulate feelings can affect performance in school, work and life. “Emotion management is tough, isn’t it?” lecturer Marc Brackett, director of the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence, asked the audience last week. “We’d all be a little healthier and happier if we were more skilled at regulating feelings.” Full Article … read more

WebMD Special Report: Teens and Stress

WebMD Special Report: Teens and Stress

Posted on Apr 18, 2016

Homework, friends, and the future are stressing teens. WebMD and Soledad O’Brien investigate what’s being done to help. Click for … read more

Social Learning: Dr. Marc Brackett Returns to Trumbull High

Posted on Apr 15, 2016

The Trumbull Times ~ April 15th, 2016 | Academic advancement can’t be achieved without prioritizing and teaching the importance of mental health. That’s the lesson Trumbull Superintendent Dr. Gary Cialfi and crisis intervention specialist Bill Mecca have learned throughout their careers as educators — one that was reinforced to them in August, when keynote speaker Dr. Marc Brackett delivered a convocation address to Trumbull faculty and administrators before kicking off the 2015-16 school year. Brackett, the director of the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence, left such a strong impression that morning that the schools knew they had to have him return to speak with students and parents about social-emotional learning. “I’ve never had a keynote speaker resonate like him,” Cialfi recalled. “The convocation usually ends with teachers jumping out of their seats to get into their classrooms, but they stayed and talked with Dr. Bracket. Full Article Here … read more

Giving Elementary Students the Tools to Handle Social-Emotional Learning

Posted on Apr 12, 2016

ntschools.org ~ April 11th, 2016 | Thanks to being awarded a nearly $1.2 million dollar elementary and secondary school counseling grant, the North Tonawanda City School District has rolled out a social-emotional learning program known as RULER… With the grant funds, the district has been able to hire four school counselors, purchase them iPads for presentations with district smartboards, RULER apps, and other supporting material to roll the program out in elementary schools this December. Full Article … read more

Emotions Matter: Emotional Intelligence is Key to Better Health, Learning and Relationships

Emotions Matter: Emotional Intelligence is Key to Better Health, Learning and Relationships

Posted on Mar 29, 2016

The Spokesman Review~ March 27th, 2016 | It’s not always easy for adults to remember exactly what high school was like. Time tends to soften the harsher side of history, leaving our memories colored by what we want to remember rather than what we actually experienced. But just talk to some of today’s teenagers and you’re likely to get a quick reminder of just how hard those school years sometimes were. Listen, for example, to Spokane high school senior Larissa Caldeira. In the fall, the 18-year-old Rogers High School student will enter Gonzaga University on a full scholarship. That kind of achievement should please anyone, and it certainly pleases Caldeira. Yet when asked to list the top emotions she experiences now on a daily basis as a high school student, she rattles them off: stress, anxiety, fatigue and nervousness. Full Article … read more

Emotional Intelligence Explained in Bridgeport

Emotional Intelligence Explained in Bridgeport

Posted on Mar 21, 2016

CT Post ~ March 18th, 2016 | BRIDGEPORT — Feelings matter. So much so that they impact learning, decisions and behavior. That was the message Marc Brackett, director of the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence, brought to a room of more than 200 Bridgeport Public Education Fund supporters on Friday. For two years, $350,000 in grants from the Tauck Family Foundation have helped support a program in the city school district called RULER, short for Recognizing, Understanding, Labeling, Expressing and Regulating emotions. First principals and teachers were trained, and this school year students started learning the basics of not only identifying feelings, but controlling them as well. Full Article … read more

Highline Students Are Latest To Learn About Emotions Along With ABCs

Posted on Mar 16, 2016

The Seattle Times ~ March 16th, 2016 | Kids at Southern Heights Elementary School in Burien are learning this month what to do in those few seconds after they feel a flash of anger, but before they act in a way that could land them in the principal’s office. Instead of lashing out, you take a deep breath and imagine how your “best self” would handle it. It’s called a “meta-moment,” part of a new effort this year to teach emotional smarts alongside academics. The school is using an approach called RULER, one of many programs being used by schools around the country to promote social and emotional learning. RULER was developed at Yale University to show students — and their teachers and principals— how to Recognize, Understand, Label, Express and Regulate emotions. Full Article … read more