Announcements

Mummy is Having a ‘Yellow Day’, Thanks for Asking

Mummy is Having a ‘Yellow Day’, Thanks for Asking

Posted on Feb 29, 2016

The Telegraph ~ February 27th, 2016 | Moments after I had given birth to my third child, my husband handed me my mobile phone. Our eldest son, Hector, three, was calling. “How are you, Mummy?” he asked. “How are you feeling?” He wasn’t being polite. He was genuinely interested in my emotional state. “Happy,” I replied. “I’m excited about introducing you to your new brother.” It’s his nursery’s fault. His teachers are encouraging children as young as two-and-a-half to talk openly about their moods and emotions. As a result, Hector is constantly asking me if I’m happy or sad. He tells me if something or someone upsets him (often with tear-jerking honesty) and when his younger brother, Alfie, two, steals his Lego, he will admit that he wants to “smash and bash” him. I take this as my cue to intervene. Full Article … read more

Will Facebook’s New Reactions Reduce Written Comments?

Will Facebook’s New Reactions Reduce Written Comments?

Posted on Feb 26, 2016

San Jose Mercury News ~ February 26th, 2016 | I have mixed feelings about Facebook’s new Reactions product. On one hand, I applaud the company for offering users a wider range of emotional responses they can easily make to other people’s posts but I worry that it might cause some to make fewer comments the old-fashioned way, by typing their original thoughts. Until Wednesday, the only way you could acknowledge a person’s post with a single click was to “like” it. That’s fine for responding to something positive, but not if the person just posted that his dog died or that she got laid off from her job. With the new Reactions, you can now hover over the Like button and also choose Love, Haha, Wow, Sad or Angry. Full Article … read more

How to Help Your Child Develop Executive Function and Self-Regulation Skills

How to Help Your Child Develop Executive Function and Self-Regulation Skills

Posted on Feb 24, 2016

Noodle.com ~ February 24th, 2016 |  The refrains from the traditional games that many of us played as children — and that many children play today — are not just the sounds of children having fun. They are also the sounds of children learning! The skills children practice when playing these games are not only important on the playground, but also in social and educational settings. Why? At the heart of each of these games is a crucial skill: executive functioning. Executive functioning has three components: Attentional flexibility: the ability to pay attention to instructions, ignore distractions, and switch focus from one task or person to another (e.g., listening expressly for the words “Simon Says”) Working memory: the ability to keep information in your mind long enough to follow through with instructions (e.g., remembering to stay still if tagged “duck” and to run if tagged “goose”) Inhibitory control: the ability to stop and respond in a way that might feel less natural, but is more appropriate (e.g., refraining from disregarding the wishes of the “mother” when those differ from what is requested) Full Article Here … read more

The Faas Foundation Announces Partnership With Yale Center For Emotional Intelligence To Study Role Of Emotions In The Workplace

Posted on Feb 22, 2016

PR Newswire ~ February 22nd, 2016 | Andrew Faas, founder of The Faas Foundation, announced a joint initiative with the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to create the Emotion Revolution in the Workplace. In order to build positive work climates, this groundbreaking initiative between business and academia will investigate the role emotions play in the work environment, including: How employees feel about their work Why they feel the way they do The impact emotions have on individual and organizational performance, overall health, and well-being How to effectively build positive workplace climates “We are excited that The Faas Foundation has decided to partner with the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to bring emotional intelligence into the workplace. Last year, we successfully launched the Emotion Revolution in school settings with the Born this Way Foundation, founded by Lady Gaga and her mom, Cynthia Germanotta. Now with support from the Faas Foundation we can launch the Emotion Revolution in the Workplace in order to promote psychologically safe and healthy workplaces for all employees,” said Dr.Marc Brackett, Director of Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence. Full Article … read more

Wellbeing RULER 2.0

Posted on Feb 9, 2016

Project Contentment: Cultivating Sustainable Wellbeing in RULER Schools For over a decade, RULER has been a leader in Emotional Intelligence approaches and curricula in schools. The aim of the RULER approach is to radically transform the educational system in order to cultivate safer, healthier, more productive learning environments for kids across all walks of life. RULER has been tested using peer-reviewed scientific methods at Yale University and beyond to show that the program reduces bullying, classroom conflict, testing anxiety, drug use, dropout rates, and many other factors related to school stressors. The leap to create Wellbeing RULER comes with a recent wave of research in the field of positive psychology over the last decade on contentment, mindfulness, self-awareness, and optimal human flourishing. Schoolwide approaches in these four areas have separately demonstrated positive shifts in student wellbeing, but they have yet to be bridged with the field of emotional intelligence. Our team believes that building this bridge for the first time ever creates a massive opportunity to implement new wellbeing-inspired curricula into the already powerful RULER approach. The goal of Wellbeing RULER is to create a leading approach to social and emotional learning that directly bridges emotional intelligence and wellbeing in schools nationwide. The Contentment team believes in cultivating a world where success in school is measured by our students’ ability cultivate wellness internally, not by their standardized test scores or levels of busyness. Rationale The Wellbeing RULER approach is guided by four principles: Cultivating Emotional Intelligence in the classroom improves school performance, classroom climate, and academic success in schools. Cultivating Mindfulness, Emotional Balance, and Psychological Wellbeing in the classroom reduces stress levels, increases student capacity to introspect and reflect, and reduces the rates of physical and psychological disease. Emotional Intelligence depends on self-awareness and the capacity to reflect. Wellbeing and Emotional Intelligence are the most powerful combination available to us for cultivating flourishing, self-aware, and socially-responsible children. Four Pillars of … read more

Martin Luther King: An Emotionally Intelligent Leader

Martin Luther King: An Emotionally Intelligent Leader

Posted on Jan 15, 2016

On January 18th, we celebrate the life of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Dr. King was an iconic leader who used his passion to strategize an end to racial and economic inequality. And, whether he was aware of doing so or not, he used emotionally intelligent techniques to persuade and inspire people of all colors to join him. As psychologists and educators affiliated with the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence, we analyzed his “I Have A Dream” speech to see just how Dr. King used the tools of emotional intelligence to lay out the grievances of social injustice and rouse the nation to action. We noticed that he used the language of strong emotions, including phrases like “We will not be satisfied until…” He chose high-energy, unpleasant feeling words likefierce, desolate, vicious, unspeakable, battered, despair, withering, and crippled. These kinds of feeling words activate and put the listener on notice. It is a basic human need to be seen and understood, and Dr. King’s empathy let his listeners “feel felt.” He acknowledged their suffering by saying, for example, “Some of you have come here out of great trials and tribulation.” And he named their experiences, acknowledging that they’d been jailed, discriminated against, blocked from the pursuit of happiness. He connected with his audience by naming the values they shared and their vision of the future. He felt, and transmitted, compassion. Halfway through this most famous speech, the “I Have A Dream” address during the 1963 March On Washington, he abandoned his prepared remarks when Mahalia Jackson, off to the side, said, “Tell them about the dream, Martin!” What he said next combined emotional intelligence and soaring rhetoric — his talk gathered into a crescendo and went down in history. And the words we most remember were off the cuff. That is how skilled he was at working with his own, and the audience’s, emotions. Dr. King took care … read more