Publication: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin

The systematic influence of gain- and loss-framed messages on interest in and use of different types of health behavior

(1999)
Center Authors: Detweiler-Bedell, B, Detweiler-Bedell, J., Salovey, P.

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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/systematic-influence-gain-loss-framed-messages-interest-use-different-types-health-behavior/

Framing health messages systematically in terms of either gains or losses influences the behaviors that people adopt.  Rothman and Salovey proposed that the relative influence of gain-and loss-framed messages is contingent on people’s perceptions of the risk or uncertainty associated with adopting the recommended behavior.

Rothman, A. J., Martino, S. C., Bedell, B. T., Detweiler, J. B., & Salovey, P. (1999). The systematic influence of gain-and loss-framed messages on interest in and use of different types of health behavior. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 25, 1355-1369. doi: 10.1177/0146167299259003

Emotional intelligence and social interaction

(2004)
Center Authors: Brackett, M. A., Salovey, P.

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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/emotional-intelligence-social-interaction/

Two studies found positive relationships between the ability to manage emotions and the quality of social interactions, supporting the predictive and incremental validity of an ability measure of emotional intelligence, the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT).

Lopes, P. N., Brackett, M. A., Nezlek, J. B., Schütz, A., Sellin, I., & Salovey, P. (2004). Emotional intelligence and social interaction. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 30, 1018-1034.doi: 10.1177/0146167204264762

Convergent, discriminant, and incremental validity of competing measures of emotional intelligence

(2003)
Center Authors: Brackett, M. A.
Topics:
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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/convergent-discriminant-incremental-validity-competing-measures-emotional-intelligence/

This study investigated the convergent, discriminant, and incremental validity of one ability test of emotional intelligence (EI)—the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso-Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT)—and two self-report measures of EI—the Emotional Quotient Inventory (EQ-i) and the self-report EI test (SREIT).

Brackett, M. A., & Mayer, J. D. (2003). Convergent, discriminant, and incremental validity of competing measures of emotional intelligence. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 29, 1147-1158. doi: 10.1177/0146167203254596

On emotionally intelligent time travel: Individual differences in affective forecasting ability

(2007)
Center Authors: Brackett, M. A., Salovey, P.
Topics:
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http://ei.yale.edu/publication/on-emotionally-intelligent-time-travel-individual-differences-in-affective-forecasting-ability/

In two studies, the authors examined whether people who are high in emotional intelligence (EI) make more accurate forecasts about their own affective responses to future events. All participants completed a performance measure of EI (the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test) as well as a self-report measure of EI. Emotion Management, a subcomponent of EI, emerged as the strongest predictor of forecasting ability.

Dunn, E. W., Brackett, M. A., Ashton-James, C., Schneiderman, E., & Salovey, P. (2007). On emotionally intelligent time travel: Individual differences in affective forecasting ability. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 33, 85-93. doi: 10.1177/0146167206294201