Ruler Announcements

Bullying: New lessons from teenagers and new conversations for everyone

Bullying: New lessons from teenagers and new conversations for everyone

A new reporting system has been deployed on Facebook for 13 to 16 year olds to manage bullying. A Bullying Prevention Hub also has been launched to help educate teachers, students, and families on how to prevent and manage bullying both on and off Facebook. Marc Brackett, Robin Stern, Arturo Bejar, and Mrinalini Rao share data on what was learned about these tools, including next steps on their journey to building a more compassionate place for teens to navigate their social lives. Watch 

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Gratitude Practice Explained

Gratitude Practice Explained

The holiday season is a good time to think about gifts, and not just the paper-wrapped kind. The people in your life can themselves be gifts—and so can a thousand other things, big and little, many of which you probably overlook day to day. Taking time during the holidays to notice, contemplate, and express gratitude for these people and things can make your holidays far more meaningful. Gratitude is a healing and supportive emotion, too. If you’re struggling with family drama, stressful travel, or disappointments, the practice of gratitude can help you through. What is gratitude? Gratitude is a state of mind that arises when you affirm a good thing in your life that comes from outside yourself, or when you notice and relish little pleasures. Though some people and things are clear blessings, this state of mind doesn’t actually depend on your life circumstances. Whether it’s the sight of a lovely face or a tasty bite of food or good health, there is always something to be grateful for. Even bad experiences at least teach us something. And gratitude is not just a feeling outside your control that arrives willy-nilly. It’s more like a radio channel: you can choose at any time to tune in. Gratitude acknowledges connection, and perhaps for this reason it is central to spiritual traditions worldwide, including Islam, Christianity, Buddhism, Hinduism, Judaism, and East Asian religions. When we contemplate our place in the intricate, interdependent network of life, we feel wonder and joy. That realization can lead us to express thanksgiving. What are the benefits of gratitude? More than any other personality trait, gratitude is strongly linked to mental health and life satisfaction. Grateful people experience more joy, love, and enthusiasm, and they enjoy protection from destructive emotions like envy, greed, and bitterness. Gratitude also reduces lifetime risk for depression, anxiety, and substance abuse disorders, and it helps people entangled with those and other problems to heal and find closure. It can give you a deep and steadfast trust that goodness exists, even in the face of uncertainty or suffering. Not only is gratitude a warm and uplifting way to feel, it benefits the body as well. People who experience gratitude cope better with stress, recover more quickly from illness, and enjoy more robust physical health, including lower blood pressure and better immune function. Unlike other positive emotions like hope and happiness, gratitude is inherently relational: it reaches past the person experiencing it and into the social realm. It is gratitude in large measure that inspires people to acts of kindness, since it’s natural to respond to gifts with heartfelt gifts of your own. And that strengthens your bonds with other people. Grateful people are rated by others as more helpful, outgoing, optimistic, and trustworthy. What is gratitude practice? Gratitude isn’t just an emotion that happens along, but a virtue we can cultivate. Think of it as something you practice as you might meditation or yoga. Gratitude practice begins by paying attention. Notice all the good things you normally take for granted. Did you sleep well last night? Did someone at work or on the street treat you with courtesy? Have you caught a glimpse of the sky, with its sun and clouds, and had a moment of peace? It also involves acknowledging that difficult and painful moments are instructive and you can be grateful for them as well. Directing our attention this way blocks feelings of victimhood. Second, consider writing about it in a journal or in a letter. Writing helps you organize thoughts, accept experiences, and put them into context, and gratitude 

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What Are You Thankful For?

In our world, it can be so easy to focus on what we don’t have and forget about what we do have. This Thanksgiving we’re doing our part to spread the spirit of gratitude by asking our RULER community what they’re thankful for. Here’s what they have to say: Anne Harlam, preschool teacher, Lycee Francais de New York, New York “I am thankful for the unwavering commitment my preschool students have demonstrated to honoring our classroom charter-book. The children’s thorough and often poignant dedication to making sure that all members of our classroom community feel HAPPY at school has improved relationships and reduced conflict–and I feel lucky every day to go to work in such a cheerful and loving environment!” Rachel Powers, elementary school teacher, Seattle Schools, Washington “I am thankful for all the ways RULER has given our students the tools they need to become their best selves; at school, home and in the community.” Sharron Russell, director of student support, Shipley School, Pennsylvania “Given the difficulties being experienced by so many people around the world, especially those in the Philippines, I am thankful for being able to take for granted so many things. In a world where so many people are struggling to meet their basic needs for health and safety, we are fortunate to be in a school where we have the luxury to be able to spend time on our students’ emotional health and safety.” Deedra Strang, speech language pathologist, Mercer Elementary School, Ohio “I am thankful for my opportunity to love and work, and for the possibilities that await me each day, to help children feel valued, hopeful, and confident. I am thankful that every day, I have RULER tools to help myself and our Mercer School community, handle challenges and thrive.” Paul Flanagan, grade 5 teacher, Girton Grammar School, Australia “We appreciate that our students and school community are growing and learning through the lens of the RULER Approach. We show our gratitude daily in the way we interact with each other using our Classroom Charters to guide our positive thoughts and behaviours.” Heather Rogers, middle school division head, Prospect Sierra School, California “I’m truly grateful for our school’s shared values and commitment to those values that our community has made in service to our Charter. Our Charter and the work we have done with RULER has given our school community an opportunity for deeper connection, for pause to understand our own experience and those of others, and for a place unlike other places in our lives–an authentic place to learn, grow and serve. It’s not always easy, and the commitment is there. It is a beautiful thing.” Julie Mayring, middle school director, Bay Ridge Prep, New York “I’m thankful to have had the opportunity to be trained in RULER and be part of a school community that supports this work. I brought back the information to share with the faculty and they’ve really taken it and run with it.” Laura Artusio, founder and director, PER Lab, Dep. of Psychology, University of Florence, Italy “I feel thankful for the trust that I received in creating a group aimed on implementing RULER in Italy. I am also thankful for trust from PER Lab scientific supervisors and from the school leaders and teachers of few Florentine schools who have been brave and decided to take the risk and try to make a change.” Karen Beja, school psychologist, Mary McDowell Friends School, New York “I am thankful for my health, my family, and the school community I work in.” Ruth Castillo, RULER Spain “I am very 

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Fewer Rules, More Feelings

“Fewer Rules, More Feelings is RULER’s approach to bullying prevention and building safe, caring, and productive schools.” ~ Marc Brackett, Yale Center for Emotional 

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Introducing the Facebook Bullying Prevention Hub

Introducing the Facebook Bullying Prevention Hub

Facebook teamed up with Marc Brackett and Robin Stern and the team at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to provide youth and adults with valuable tools and strategies to help them effectively address bullying behavior and its consequences. The combined goal is to develop innovative educational approaches that empower people of all ages with the emotional intelligence skills they need to succeed. With the new Bullying Prevention Hub, bullying victims will be armed with information on what they can do when they see harassing content, recommendations to adults who want to help, and even guidance to the person accused of bullying on what he or she has done and how he or she can do better. Learn 

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Emotional Intelligence: From Theory to Everyday Practice

In this presentation from the 2013 Yale Presidential Inauguration Symposia, Marc Brackett will describe the theory of emotional intelligence developed at Yale under President Salovey’s direction and share his decades of research on the relationship between emotional intelligence and important life outcomes. He also will discuss “RULER” the Center’s evidence-based approach to teaching emotional intelligence in school systems, which has been shown to increase academic performance, decrease bullying, and enhance school climates. Finally, he’ll discuss how creating emotionally intelligent communities can help us to build a more happy, healthy, productive, and compassionate 

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4th Compassion Research Day at Facebook

4th Compassion Research Day at Facebook

Marc Brackett and Robin Stern will present research on how teenagers navigate online bullying situations, as well as providing better tools for them, at Facebook’s 4th Compassion Research Day. The day is open to anyone who would like to attend, and will be streamed. Learn 

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Emotional intelligence center relaunched

Yale Daily News-Since its official opening on Oct. 1, the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence has been in a constant flurry of activity. The Center — a research institution located atop Science Hill that conducts studies on the emotional and social skills of children and adults — grew out of the former Health, Emotion and Behavior Laboratory, which was founded by University President Peter Salovey in 1986. Read Full 

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Missed our symposium on emotional intelligence? Watch the recorded Livestream now.

Missed our symposium on emotional intelligence? Watch the recorded Livestream now.

Emotions Matter. The past, present, and future of emotional intelligence, a symposium with opening remarks by President Peter Salovey. Topics include: Education, creativity, bullying, & Facebook. This video includes talks by: Marc Brackett (Yale): Welcome and introduction to Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence Peter Salovey (Yale): Opening remarks Marc Brackett (Yale): A brief history of emotional intelligence Edward Seidman (WT Grant Foundation & NYU): Creating positive youth settings Roger Weissberg (CASEL): Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) and policy Susan Rivers (Yale): RULER, the Center’s evidence-based SEL program Diana Divecha (Yale): RULER and bullying prevention Arturo Bejar (Facebook): Emotional intelligence & social media Zorana Pringle (Yale): Emotional intelligence and creativity Watch 

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Teaching Emotional Intelligence

Teaching Emotional Intelligence

Marc Brackett on Wisconsin Public Radio speaking about teaching emotional intelligence to kids around the country, and says it’s a skill we can develop and learn. 

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